What are you reading tonight?

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What are you reading tonight?

Post by Dave Sutton's barnet » Sat Apr 26, 2008 12:18 am

Sure we've had a similar thread but couldn't find it. Chugging through Adrian Chiles' We Don't Know What We're Doing. Nice enough bloke, nice enough book. Is that damning with faint praise?

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Post by Lord Kangana » Sat Apr 26, 2008 12:47 am

The Count of Monte Cristo.

Just over halfway through the 1250 pages of it, and to be frank, I'm kicking myself that I've never read it before. Highly reccomended.
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Post by TANGODANCER » Sat Apr 26, 2008 1:16 pm

Lord Kangana wrote:The Count of Monte Cristo.

Just over halfway through the 1250 pages of it, and to be frank, I'm kicking myself that I've never read it before. Highly reccomended.
Lot of the older books are good reading. I bought J.Fennimore Cooper's "Last of the Mohicans" again about a year ago. Loved Ivanhoe, Westward Ho, Treasure Island, Kidnapped etc and can still read and enjoy them all. Bought David Gibbin's "The last Gospel" a couple of weeks ago, very dissapointing. Currently reading "The Templar" by Paul Doherty.
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Post by Lord Kangana » Sat Apr 26, 2008 1:23 pm

TANGODANCER wrote:
Lord Kangana wrote:The Count of Monte Cristo.

Just over halfway through the 1250 pages of it, and to be frank, I'm kicking myself that I've never read it before. Highly reccomended.
Lot of the older books are good reading. I bought J.Fennimore Cooper's "Last of the Mohicans" again about a year ago. Loved Ivanhoe, Westward Ho, Treasure Island, Kidnapped etc and can still read and enjoy them all. Bought David Gibbin's "The last Gospel" a couple of weeks ago, very dissapointing. Currently reading "The Templar" by Paul Doherty.
I was having this chat with a couple of work colleagues only a few weeks ago. I think many modern novels are talked up simply to boost sales, whereas many of the classics have withstood the test of time.

Also an interesting discussion point was 'is it ok to criticise a "classic"?' Only I brought up the point that I didn't enjoy reading Catch 22, The Catcher in The Rye (I gave up on that one) and The Grapes of Wrath, and I prefer Brave New World to 1984.

It is all personal opinion, isn't it, or does that mark me out as a heathen?
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Post by Montreal Wanderer » Sat Apr 26, 2008 2:01 pm

Lord Kangana wrote:
TANGODANCER wrote:
Lord Kangana wrote:The Count of Monte Cristo.

Just over halfway through the 1250 pages of it, and to be frank, I'm kicking myself that I've never read it before. Highly reccomended.
Lot of the older books are good reading. I bought J.Fennimore Cooper's "Last of the Mohicans" again about a year ago. Loved Ivanhoe, Westward Ho, Treasure Island, Kidnapped etc and can still read and enjoy them all. Bought David Gibbin's "The last Gospel" a couple of weeks ago, very dissapointing. Currently reading "The Templar" by Paul Doherty.
I was having this chat with a couple of work colleagues only a few weeks ago. I think many modern novels are talked up simply to boost sales, whereas many of the classics have withstood the test of time.

Also an interesting discussion point was 'is it ok to criticise a "classic"?' Only I brought up the point that I didn't enjoy reading Catch 22, The Catcher in The Rye (I gave up on that one) and The Grapes of Wrath, and I prefer Brave New World to 1984.

It is all personal opinion, isn't it, or does that mark me out as a heathen?
Of course it is okay to dislike some of the classics. Taste is personal. Me, I couldn't stand George Eliot but read everything Alexander Dumas wrote - the Count isn't the only good one. The important thing is to enjoy what you read not read what everyone else says you should like. And some things you don't like at one age, you may like years later.
"If you cannot answer a man's argument, all it not lost; you can still call him vile names. " Elbert Hubbard.
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Post by TANGODANCER » Sat Apr 26, 2008 2:13 pm

Only good read is the one you enjoy. I always have my copy of "The Rubaiyat" handy, not everybody's idea of a good read. Matters not, I love it. As for what are considered "classics", I'd sooner use the word " evergreens". Gives a wider view that that of an Oxford Don, if you will. Try reading the Spanish version of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba". Classic fxxking hard work is all. :wink:
The wisest and the best of men, nay, the wisest and best of their actions, may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke...Darcy. Pride and Prejudice.

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Post by Lord Kangana » Sat Apr 26, 2008 2:22 pm

TANGODANCER wrote:Only good read is the one you enjoy. I always have my copy of "The Rubaiyat" handy, not everybody's idea of a good read. Matters not, I love it. As for what are considered "classics", I'd sooner use the word " evergreens". Gives a wider view that that of an Oxford Don, if you will. Try reading the Spanish version of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's "El Coronel no tiene quien le escriba". Classic fxxking hard work is all. :wink:
I like the definition Tango :)

I've bought Don Quixote as my next read after The Count, but have been warned that its "Hard work". I shall soon find out..

(ps, whats The Rubaiyat?)
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Post by Dave Sutton's barnet » Sat Apr 26, 2008 4:03 pm

Montreal Wanderer wrote:The important thing is to enjoy what you read not read what everyone else says you should like.
:pray:

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Post by bobby5 » Sat Apr 26, 2008 8:24 pm

Currently reading The Monkey Wrench Gang by Edward Abbey

Interesting list of cult books in The Telegraph today.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jh ... ist126.xml
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Post by Lord Kangana » Sat Apr 26, 2008 8:52 pm

bobby5 wrote:Currently reading The Monkey Wrench Gang by Edward Abbey

Interesting list of cult books in The Telegraph today.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jh ... ist126.xml

Read about half a dozen off the list - though not entirely sure whats 'cult' about them. P'raps they needed to make up the numbers? :wink:
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Post by officer_dibble » Sat Apr 26, 2008 10:29 pm

footie book for me holiday? any reccomendations?

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Post by Lord Kangana » Sat Apr 26, 2008 10:31 pm

The WSC 'Power Corruption and Pies' ones are quite good (if quite old now).
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Post by Dave Sutton's barnet » Sat Apr 26, 2008 11:15 pm

WSC have released some cracking books - Tor! is a very readable history of the German game. I enjoyed Gianluca Vialli's The Italian Job, a thoughtful exploration of the differences between Italian and English culture, footballing and otherwise. And it's better than that description might sound.

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Post by TANGODANCER » Sat Apr 26, 2008 11:41 pm

Lord Kangana wrote: [I like the definition Tango :)
I've bought Don Quixote as my next read after The Count, but have been warned that its "Hard work". I shall soon find out..
(ps, whats The Rubaiyat?)
A collection of pure, timeless, twelfth century wisdom in poetry from by Omay Khayyam.

The pearls of thought in Persian Gulfs were bred,
Each softly lucent as a rounded moon.
The Diver, Omar, plucked them from their bed,
Fitzgerald strung them on an English thread.

That bit's for Monty. :wink:
Last edited by TANGODANCER on Sat Apr 26, 2008 11:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Lord Kangana » Sat Apr 26, 2008 11:45 pm

TANGODANCER wrote:
Lord Kangana wrote: [I like the definition Tango :)
I've bought Don Quixote as my next read after The Count, but have been warned that its "Hard work". I shall soon find out..
(ps, whats The Rubaiyat?)
A collection of pure, timeless, twelfth century wisdom in poetry from by Omay Khayyam.

The pearls of thought in Persian Gulfs were bred,
Each softly lucent as a rounded moon.
The Driver, Omar, plucked them from their bed,
Fitzgerald strung them on an English thread.

That bit's for Monty. :wink:
Didn't he sell shavers? :wink:
You can judge the whole world on the sparkle that you think it lacks.
Yes, you can stare into the abyss, but it's staring right back.

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Post by TANGODANCER » Sat Apr 26, 2008 11:47 pm

Lord Kangana wrote:
TANGODANCER wrote:
Lord Kangana wrote: [I like the definition Tango :)
I've bought Don Quixote as my next read after The Count, but have been warned that its "Hard work". I shall soon find out..
(ps, whats The Rubaiyat?)
A collection of pure, timeless, twelfth century wisdom in poetry from by Omay Khayyam.

The pearls of thought in Persian Gulfs were bred,
Each softly lucent as a rounded moon.
The Diver, Omar, plucked them from their bed,
Fitzgerald strung them on an English thread.

That bit's for Monty. :wink:
Didn't he sell shavers? :wink:
No, but he plucked a few beards nevertheless. Was a great exponent of the grape too: :D
The wisest and the best of men, nay, the wisest and best of their actions, may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke...Darcy. Pride and Prejudice.

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Post by Dujon » Sun Apr 27, 2008 2:22 am

Has anyone here (or in the whole world for that matter) ever read Thackeray's Henry Esmond from front to back? It was required reading in the English syllabus of 1961 - as directed and controlled by the N.S.W. Dept. of Education. I never did get beyond the first couple of chapters. Fortunately it didn't damage my results in the end of year examinations as I still passed them.

I tried again a few months ago (the school copy of the book somehow managed to stay in my possession) with the same result. It may be that I had consumed a little too much wine before the attempt; maybe not enough; maybe memories of the past haunt me?

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Post by Worthy4England » Sun Apr 27, 2008 9:39 am

Dujon wrote:Has anyone here (or in the whole world for that matter) ever read Thackeray's Henry Esmond from front to back? It was required reading in the English syllabus of 1961 - as directed and controlled by the N.S.W. Dept. of Education. I never did get beyond the first couple of chapters. Fortunately it didn't damage my results in the end of year examinations as I still passed them.

I tried again a few months ago (the school copy of the book somehow managed to stay in my possession) with the same result. It may be that I had consumed a little too much wine before the attempt; maybe not enough; maybe memories of the past haunt me?
No, but a similar(ish) story here - had to read Great Expectations for English (Lit) and never got past the first couple of chapters...I have to say anyone who thinks it's a "good read" needs their bumps testing.

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Post by CrazyHorse » Sun Apr 27, 2008 9:52 am

Absolutely love Stephen King's The Shining, must've read it scores of times.
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Post by Dr Hotdog » Sun Apr 27, 2008 11:38 am

I recently read Things The Grandchildren Should Know by Mark Oliver Everett AKA E from the Eels.
Great story and brilliantly written like many of his songs.
Having only seen him the once at a festival a few years ago I'm definitely going to catch him next time they tour.

Right now i'm dipping in and out of (with the help of my old man's record collection) Miles Beyond - The Electric Explorations
of Miles Davis 1967-1991.
It's tough going!

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