Questions to which I can't find answers:

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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Prufrock » Wed Jun 05, 2019 12:54 pm

Loved Enid Blyton as a kid. Couple of FF SS but mainly the collections of short stories (13 o'clock etc).

Tried Jane Austen a couple of times but not for me. Brontes I keep meaning to have another go at. George Eliot though, she could write. Middlemarch one of my favourite novels. Deserves consideration up there with Shakespeare for me in terms of developing character and personality.
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by jmjhb » Wed Jun 05, 2019 1:10 pm

Prufrock wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 12:54 pm
Loved Enid Blyton as a kid. Couple of FF SS but mainly the collections of short stories (13 o'clock etc).

Yeah, certain cultural bits haven't aged well but they were really creative and evocative works.

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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Wed Jun 05, 2019 2:07 pm

jimbo wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 11:58 am
Re cricket.

In the longer form of the game (eg test matches, county championship 4 or 5 day stuff) there’s usually time allocated to catch up for any rain delays. Usually an early start the next day and extended evening session. This can catch up about 90minutes a day. If at the end of the 5 days, there’s no winner it’s simply a draw. Same as if all 5 days are washed out.

In limited overs (one day, twenty20) the duckworth Lewis is used. That’s a calculation to work out how many the side batting second need to have scored each over in case their innings is reduced in duration. Eg, side batting first scores 250 from 50 overs, Side batting second are 110/3 off 20 when the rain starts. The D/L will give a ‘par’ score as to how many runs the side batting second should have scored allowing for the fact they’ve lost 3 wickets. If they are above that, they win, if not, they lose.

Your original question was to do with why there’s a rain break. Simply put the game becomes shit in the rain. You can’t hold the ball properly if it’s wet or greasy, so bowling becomes nigh on impossible. A wet wicket will mean the bowlers slip and skid when landing risking injury. A wet wicket gives inconsistent bounce risking injury to the batsman. They’ll often play through a bit of rain but the umpires ultimately make a call as to whether it’s starting to affect the outcome of the game, and if so bring them off.
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Wed Jun 05, 2019 2:21 pm

TANGODANCER wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 12:32 pm
Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 11:16 am
Confession time: I've never read any Biggles. Nor have I read any Jeeves, Fabulous Five (or whatever they were called), or Jane Austen. Haven't read My Family and Other Animals, and never turned a page of Tennessee Williams (but I've seen allllllll of his films!)
Confession time 2: Famous Five, Secret Seven and Swallows and Amazons were happy childhood memories that I believe every child of any era should read and enjoy, and are books of times long past for us. I know most of Omar Khayyam's quatrains off by heart and read half-an-hour of Jane Austen every night right through her six major novels (all of which I also know off by heart to the extent I could lecture on them) ) and repeat ad infinitum. What better way to learn about nineteenth century England than from the pen of someone who actually lived it? Her creation of characters is second to none and relies on the mind and imagination of the reader rather than just the dictums of the writer. Plus the woman was well educated and highly intelligent in life. Sir Walter Scott and Rudyard Kipling thought so too, although the Bronte's weren't her greatest fans. Such a tragedy that their lives were so very short. Jane Austen was the eldest of them and she died at just 41 years old.

My book collection will always be reasonably small because, personally, I think it utter foolishness to use books as ornaments. Unless you are going to read them, why have them? Keep just those you'll read again. Same with first editions etc, why lock a book away in pristine condition and not read it, or put a Van Gogh, Renoir, Monet etc painting..in a bank safe. Anyway (standard closer word ?) it's all about personal choice in the end, so read happily on... :D
I have about (guesswork here) ~5,000 books (based on two rooms, four walls each, about fourteen foot square, with shelves six to eight rows deep).
I'm not ever going to read them all again but I remember reading them first time around. And most are non fiction. Plus a few are first edition. Some are signed first edition. Others are just obscurely collectible (I have Einstein's primer in physics with an 1890 era periodic table - good provenance but not unassailable - cost me £250 over forty years ago. I also have a copy of a grimoires owned by Aleister Crowley with total provenance, cost me nothing, handed down to me by my great grandfather).
But mostly I just love books, and when I could finally afford a house with more rooms than I 'needed' I built myself a private library. At the time, nineteen years ago, I still had space on the shelves... Not anymore. I've got piles all over the place. I need to cull some, but find it painful.
You don't have to reread books to appreciate them.*

* They can also make you money. I first started collecting Iain (M) Banks when I got given the Wasp Factory as a Christmas present. I bought two copies of every book he wrote, and got them all signed (which isn't particularly rare with him), including his book on whisky.
I sold one complete set of signed first editions to a collector a year ago. It's safe to say that repaid a fair chunk of the outlay I've 'invested' in my library.
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Wed Jun 05, 2019 3:54 pm

Just counted them. 6,702.
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by TANGODANCER » Wed Jun 05, 2019 6:14 pm

Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 3:54 pm
Just counted them. 6,702.
I'd get divorced....In addition to far too many books anyway, I still have a real load of cassettes and videos (old type) from my dance and flamenco hobbies that I really should get rid of. I used to run an online dance web and I have a book sent to my by a well-known flamenco dancer of world renown, now sadly passed on. He was a Bulgarian living in America who still danced at the real top level of the art in his seventies. An amazing man who befriended me via the internet we corresponded for a couple/three years. He sent me quite unasked, videos of his shows and lessons and two books he wrote. His long-time wife, also a dancer, died in his arms on stage. He signed one of the books of which I am greatly proud "Para my gran amigo, Jim. Salud, Arte, Amore y Amistad. Teo Morca. (For my great friend Jim, Health, Art, and Friendship!"

R.I.P Teo (Theodoro)

Probabaly of little interest to most, but here's the man...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQnJhcYkzgc
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Enoch » Wed Jun 05, 2019 6:29 pm

Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 3:46 pm
And, why don't all clouds rain? Why some and not others, I mean they're all composed of water, why do some leak and some float serenely onwards?

As with t'internet posters, some is denser than what ovvers is.

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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by TANGODANCER » Wed Jun 05, 2019 6:35 pm

Enoch wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 6:29 pm
Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 3:46 pm
And, why don't all clouds rain? Why some and not others, I mean they're all composed of water, why do some leak and some float serenely onwards?

As with t'internet posters, some is denser than what ovvers is.
:lol:
The wisest and the best of men, nay, the wisest and best of their actions, may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke...Darcy. Pride and Prejudice.

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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Harry Genshaw » Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:28 pm

I do now know the answer to this but it used to puzzle me.

If I post a letter from say Burkina Faso to the United States and pay 5 BF Shillings for the stamp, what's in it for the US postal service to actually deliver it?
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by jimbo » Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:09 pm

Harry Genshaw wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:28 pm
I do now know the answer to this but it used to puzzle me.

If I post a letter from say Burkina Faso to the United States and pay 5 BF Shillings for the stamp, what's in it for the US postal service to actually deliver it?
Do the destination postal service bill back the country it was sent from? EG if we sent something to Australia we’d buy an expensive stamp here, presumably to cover their domestic delivery fee as well as our own. They then send an invoice to the Royal Mail to claim back their bit.

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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Harry Genshaw » Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:49 pm

jimbo wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:09 pm
Harry Genshaw wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:28 pm
I do now know the answer to this but it used to puzzle me.

If I post a letter from say Burkina Faso to the United States and pay 5 BF Shillings for the stamp, what's in it for the US postal service to actually deliver it?
Do the destination postal service bill back the country it was sent from? EG if we sent something to Australia we’d buy an expensive stamp here, presumably to cover their domestic delivery fee as well as our own. They then send an invoice to the Royal Mail to claim back their bit.
No. There's an international collective and standard they all adhere too. The wealthier nations pay more into the pot and delivery rates are monitored to try to ensure a good level of service across the globe.
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Gooner Girl » Thu Jun 06, 2019 10:12 am

TANGODANCER wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 12:32 pm
Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 11:16 am
Confession time: I've never read any Biggles. Nor have I read any Jeeves, Fabulous Five (or whatever they were called), or Jane Austen. Haven't read My Family and Other Animals, and never turned a page of Tennessee Williams (but I've seen allllllll of his films!)
Confession time 2: Famous Five, Secret Seven and Swallows and Amazons were happy childhood memories that I believe every child of any era should read and enjoy, and are books of times long past for us.
We’ve not read swallows and amazons or Biggles yet but the twins have enjoyed many Enid Blyton and also Just William and Jennings books. Books that even when I enjoyed them were from a long gone era. Timeless classics. One of the best bits about the kids growing up (and I’m not good with them growing up!) is seeing them enjoy things you loved yourself whether that be your favourite books or your favourite football team!

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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Gooner Girl » Thu Jun 06, 2019 12:36 pm

Harry Genshaw wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:49 pm
jimbo wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:09 pm
Harry Genshaw wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:28 pm
I do now know the answer to this but it used to puzzle me.

If I post a letter from say Burkina Faso to the United States and pay 5 BF Shillings for the stamp, what's in it for the US postal service to actually deliver it?
Do the destination postal service bill back the country it was sent from? EG if we sent something to Australia we’d buy an expensive stamp here, presumably to cover their domestic delivery fee as well as our own. They then send an invoice to the Royal Mail to claim back their bit.
No. There's an international collective and standard they all adhere too. The wealthier nations pay more into the pot and delivery rates are monitored to try to ensure a good level of service across the globe.
Every days a school day! Are there any countries that don’t pay in so therefore you couldn’t post to? Ones hit by war/crisis of some kind?

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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Burnden Paddock » Thu Jun 06, 2019 1:04 pm

Harry Genshaw wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:49 pm
jimbo wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:09 pm
Harry Genshaw wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:28 pm
I do now know the answer to this but it used to puzzle me.

If I post a letter from say Burkina Faso to the United States and pay 5 BF Shillings for the stamp, what's in it for the US postal service to actually deliver it?
Do the destination postal service bill back the country it was sent from? EG if we sent something to Australia we’d buy an expensive stamp here, presumably to cover their domestic delivery fee as well as our own. They then send an invoice to the Royal Mail to claim back their bit.
No. There's an international collective and standard they all adhere too. The wealthier nations pay more into the pot and delivery rates are monitored to try to ensure a good level of service across the globe.
Bloody hell. The evenings must fly by in your house! :wink:

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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Thu Jun 06, 2019 1:24 pm

Harry Genshaw wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:49 pm
jimbo wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:09 pm
Harry Genshaw wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:28 pm
I do now know the answer to this but it used to puzzle me.

If I post a letter from say Burkina Faso to the United States and pay 5 BF Shillings for the stamp, what's in it for the US postal service to actually deliver it?
Do the destination postal service bill back the country it was sent from? EG if we sent something to Australia we’d buy an expensive stamp here, presumably to cover their domestic delivery fee as well as our own. They then send an invoice to the Royal Mail to claim back their bit.
No. There's an international collective and standard they all adhere too. The wealthier nations pay more into the pot and delivery rates are monitored to try to ensure a good level of service across the globe.
It's called the Universal Postal Union.
Once upon a time each country released a commemorative UPU stamp (on the same theme each year) to pay for the scheme - they tend to be very collectible now.
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Thu Jun 06, 2019 1:44 pm

Gooner Girl wrote:
Thu Jun 06, 2019 12:36 pm
Are there any countries that don’t pay in so therefore you couldn’t post to? Ones hit by war/crisis of some kind?
Not really. Currently just four countries are non members:
Taiwan, Palestine, Northern Cyprus and Somaliland.

However historically there have been plenty. Back then the recipient at the other end tended to get hit with a 'Postage Due' stamp to cover the costs...until the authorities discovered people like me had a network of friends in non-UPU countries who sold me their envelopes complete with rare postage due labels which we then sold on to philatelists... The fxckers learnt to just leave a message with the recipient to collect from a post office and fine them and busted apart a nice little earner.
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Thu Jun 06, 2019 1:46 pm

Burnden Paddock wrote:
Thu Jun 06, 2019 1:04 pm

Bloody hell. The evenings must fly by in your house! :wink:
It's part and parcel of being a Wanderer. Too much excitement can prove fatal.
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by TANGODANCER » Thu Jun 06, 2019 2:32 pm

Prufrock wrote:
Wed Jun 05, 2019 12:54 pm
Loved Enid Blyton as a kid. Couple of FF SS but mainly the collections of short stories (13 o'clock etc).
Just brought to mind "The Wishing Chair" Used to terrify me a bit as a kid the thought of a chair flying. We'd never heard of seat belts back then. :D
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Thu Jun 06, 2019 2:55 pm

Anyway... Answers to which I never knew I had a question:

1. Peanuts:
Ron "Pigpen" McKernan, founder and vocalist of the Grateful Dead was nicknamed after the character pigpen in Peanuts, and not the other way around as I've always assumed.
2. Peanuts:
the inspiration behind the title for the BBC groundbreaking comedy Monty Python's Flying Circus, was the comic strip. In 1965 Snoopy started to dream of fighting the Red Baron, in reality Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen, who commanded the first world war squadron known as 'the Flying Circus'.
BBC bosses had wanted their name to include the word "circus" because the BBC head of comedy referred to the six members wandering around the building as a circus. The group added "flying" to make it sound less like an actual circus and more like something from World War I. because in 1966 Royal Guardsmen had a hit song Snoopy vs. the Red Baron based on the Peanuts strip.
The words "Monty Python" were added because they claimed it sounded like a really bad theatrical agent, the sort of person who would have brought them together, with John Cleese suggesting "Python" as something slimy and slithery.
3. Brazil nuts:
Brazil nuts are not named after the country they are found in. The opposite in fact; Brazil the country is named after the nuts found there.
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Re: Questions to which I can't find answers:

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Thu Jun 06, 2019 3:32 pm

And... Here's a question to which I never knew I needed an answer. And after substantial research, still can't find a definitive answer:

How often should we poo?

Personally, I tend to shit once a day, at daybreak, just after I've got up. Sometimes after a small amount of exercise (like taking the dog out at six thirty in the morning) I need another poo to completely evacuate the bowels, but mostly first poo is the only poo. Very, very occasionally I need to do one later on in the evening.
Mostly mine are like heavy toothpaste. Sometimes lumpy, and sometimes like just dropping a pint of Guinness from two metres.
I think, but have no real idea, that I'm normal in this regard.

(I only mentioned this coz it was on the BBC website, and not because I'm a poo pervert).
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