Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

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Enoch
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Enoch » Tue Apr 30, 2019 7:53 pm

Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Tue Apr 30, 2019 2:20 pm
Enoch wrote:
Mon Apr 29, 2019 7:32 pm
Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Mon Apr 29, 2019 4:51 pm
Then again most people aren't as nutty as this fruitcake. And NASA employ her!

https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/weird- ... core-video
That might explain all those 0.5 magnitude earthquakes rattling Lancashire to the ground of late!
Nah, that's Theresa May banging her head on a table at the same time Tom Watson stomps out of a Labour NEC meeting.

I have it on good authority that slamming a wooden door registers more than 0.5 on the Richter Scale.

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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Wed May 01, 2019 3:24 pm

Enoch wrote:
Tue Apr 30, 2019 7:53 pm
Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Tue Apr 30, 2019 2:20 pm
Enoch wrote:
Mon Apr 29, 2019 7:32 pm
Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Mon Apr 29, 2019 4:51 pm
Then again most people aren't as nutty as this fruitcake. And NASA employ her!

https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/weird- ... core-video
That might explain all those 0.5 magnitude earthquakes rattling Lancashire to the ground of late!
Nah, that's Theresa May banging her head on a table at the same time Tom Watson stomps out of a Labour NEC meeting.

I have it on good authority that slamming a wooden door registers more than 0.5 on the Richter Scale.
Good. I don't want Ineos or any other Fxcker constantly slamming wooden doors underneath my house thank you very much.
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Wed Jul 03, 2019 1:50 pm

It's already got elephants in it, fercrizsake!
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/06/2 ... _universe/
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:48 pm

There are 11, eleven, things wrong with how we conceptualise the universe and the physics behind that conceptualisation.
These eleven things aren't merely surface blemishes, they are fundamental concepts that destroy the idea that Relativity and Quantum Physics actually describe what it is that we observe.
Don't misunderstand me, Relativity and Quantum Physics describe everything we know better than any other theory. But. They are mutually exclusive, and have major flaws.
I'm not seeing anything better. Which is very disappointing. Einstein's been dead for a while now... We need the next step forward.
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Fri Jul 19, 2019 11:54 am

Well it's comforting to know: Dark Matter won't kill you...

https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.06674
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Enoch » Fri Jul 19, 2019 12:26 pm

Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Fri Jul 19, 2019 11:54 am
Well it's comforting to know: Dark Matter won't kill you...

https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.06674
I think the dark matter may well eventually get the better of me.

:drink:

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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Fri Jul 19, 2019 12:29 pm

Enoch wrote:
Fri Jul 19, 2019 12:26 pm
Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Fri Jul 19, 2019 11:54 am
Well it's comforting to know: Dark Matter won't kill you...

https://arxiv.org/abs/1907.06674
I think the dark matter may well eventually get the better of me.

:drink:
You need to write a paper about it: The Human Body as a Dark Matter Envelope 8)
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Thu Jul 25, 2019 3:16 pm

Fxck Brexit! A new twist on the Hubble Constant has been preliminarily published. We could be in for the long haul after all...

https://www.skyandtelescope.com/astrono ... -constant/

Preliminarily published! Is that a thing?
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Dujon » Fri Jul 26, 2019 4:02 am

Of course it is, Spotty; Just like Isles' and others predictions published re the demise or otherwise of BWFC.
As far as astronomy and cosmology is concerned I have always had reservations about the publishing of the Cepheid variable stars being used as a 'candle' and being incontrovertible. Likewise with the then extended versions using supernova and red giants.
My latest copy of the Australian version of S&T has lain for a couple of weeks unread - I must garner some energy to unseal it. :)

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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Fri Jul 26, 2019 8:27 am

Dujon wrote:
Fri Jul 26, 2019 4:02 am
Of course it is, Spotty; Just like Isles' and others predictions published re the demise or otherwise of BWFC.
As far as astronomy and cosmology is concerned I have always had reservations about the publishing of the Cepheid variable stars being used as a 'candle' and being incontrovertible. Likewise with the then extended versions using supernova and red giants.
My latest copy of the Australian version of S&T has lain for a couple of weeks unread - I must garner some energy to unseal it. :)
Is it printed upside down (Pommy joke)? With the north at the top of the star maps (stargazer's inside joke)? :D
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Dujon » Sat Jul 27, 2019 3:13 am

Ah, Spotty, you uneducated Europeans never cease to amaze me (no wonder some of you support Brexit) of course they are. I must also apologise to Mr Iles for misspelling his family name - most embarrassing. :oops:

Anyway, it's good to meet a fellow who admires the celestial sphere and the scientists and observers who continue the work of their predecessors in trying to solve the seemingly unsolvable. I began my observing years ago when I was given a 50mm refracting telescope as a gift from my parents, I would have been about fifteen-years of age. I still have it somewhere, tucked away in its original packaging. Much, much, later I bought a 10" Newtonian with a Dobsonian mount. Seventh heaven, Spotty.

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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Sat Jul 27, 2019 8:51 am

Dujon wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 3:13 am
Ah, Spotty, you uneducated Europeans never cease to amaze me (no wonder some of you support Brexit) of course they are. I must also apologise to Mr Iles for misspelling his family name - most embarrassing. :oops:

Anyway, it's good to meet a fellow who admires the celestial sphere and the scientists and observers who continue the work of their predecessors in trying to solve the seemingly unsolvable. I began my observing years ago when I was given a 50mm refracting telescope as a gift from my parents, I would have been about fifteen-years of age. I still have it somewhere, tucked away in its original packaging. Much, much, later I bought a 10" Newtonian with a Dobsonian mount. Seventh heaven, Spotty.
I used to have a reflector. My current one is an old Helios 6" refractor. I plan for building a shed in the future to accommodate a new reflector, but that's some years away yet. The Helios is pretty good for a refractor, although obviously not as good a light bucket as a bloody big Newtonian.
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by TANGODANCER » Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:12 am

Another Dummy question that may get an answer here that doesn't need 47 degreees (the paper version) in science and technology to understand, thus, as I understand things (don't) :

If we look at a map of the stars lying on a table before us, in reality we need to reverse it 180 degrees so that it's actually over our heads (stick it on the ceiling, so to speak) in order to find the actual positions of stars in the galaxy. Do we then need to actually tango around (forgive the pun) so that north on the map points in the direction we know (assume) north to be to get some sort of accuracy of reading. There are no traces of James Patrick Galileo Galilei in the family tree, so maybe my lack of the celestial can be pardoned a little.

There is also the fact that looking at a computer monitor map changes the confusion level angles somewhat more/less.( I was never that much of a Dan Dare ( he wasn't Irish) or Flash Gordon fan, although I read John Carter and Thomas Covenant avidly, ) preferring things a bit nearer home.

Thanking you in anticipation, your confused stargazing fellow Wanderers dreamer....Tango. :D
The wisest and the best of men, nay, the wisest and best of their actions, may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke...Darcy. Pride and Prejudice.

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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Sat Jul 27, 2019 11:47 am

TANGODANCER wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 9:12 am
Another Dummy question that may get an answer here that doesn't need 47 degreees (the paper version) in science and technology to understand, thus, as I understand things (don't) :

If we look at a map of the stars lying on a table before us, in reality we need to reverse it 180 degrees so that it's actually over our heads (stick it on the ceiling, so to speak) in order to find the actual positions of stars in the galaxy. Do we then need to actually tango around (forgive the pun) so that north on the map points in the direction we know (assume) north to be to get some sort of accuracy of reading. There are no traces of James Patrick Galileo Galilei in the family tree, so maybe my lack of the celestial can be pardoned a little.

There is also the fact that looking at a computer monitor map changes the confusion level angles somewhat more/less.( I was never that much of a Dan Dare ( he wasn't Irish) or Flash Gordon fan, although I read John Carter and Thomas Covenant avidly, ) preferring things a bit nearer home.

Thanking you in anticipation, your confused stargazing fellow Wanderers dreamer....Tango. :D
The simple answer is maybe.
Conventionally, because the image viewed through old fashioned telescopes were upside down then the star atlases and maps of the moon etc. followed the same convention. But not always nowadays, there is more of a movement to follow geographical convention especially in magazines, newspapers and the internet. You just have to check where north is.
And yes for large scale star maps you usually have to view the star outlay as though you were holding the map above your head, but obviously not if astrographical convention is being followed.

For astral coordinates you need to know about Azimuthal projection: An azimuth is an angular measurement in a spherical coordinate system. Wikipedia has a good section on Azimuthal projection which is a relatively straightforward read.

Also, like earthbound maps, different projections are used - the most common for sky maps is the Stereographic Projection.
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by TANGODANCER » Sat Jul 27, 2019 1:22 pm

^^

Thanks for that Spots, it was a genuine question of interest. At night, when I stand in my back garden, I never know which way to face to find anything, and that damn moon won't stay still.I know the compass directions from here, but I'll check the sites you mention although it all still sounds a bit er....confusing. :wink:
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Sat Jul 27, 2019 1:36 pm

TANGODANCER wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 1:22 pm
^^

Thanks for that Spots, it was a genuine question of interest. At night, when I stand in my back garden, I never know which way to face to find anything, and that damn moon won't stay still.I know the compass directions from here, but I'll check the sites you mention although it all still sounds a bit er....confusing. :wink:
That's the problem with the heavens, Tango... the bloody Earth just won't keep still.
Very early on as a youth I learned the easiest way to navigate the stars. You just need to memorise five constellations: Orion, Cassiopeia, and the Plough (a.k.a the Big Dipper, Great Bear, Ursa Major) being the easiest, and establish from them where the ecliptic lies. After that learn where the Polar (North) star is - the leftmost arm of the W that constitutes Cassiopeia points directly to it (it is also the easiest star to spot in the sparsest part of the sky). Once you are armed with those waypointers you can't go wrong. Dujon, of course would need an entirely different set of waypointers, the Southern Cross being one of them.
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Sat Jul 27, 2019 1:52 pm

Of course, you need to be in a spot where you can actually make out the constellations. The amount of bloody light pollution these days makes it difficult. Being on the edge of the Peak District helps, but I've got no idea how Farnworth/Greater Bolton fares.
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by TANGODANCER » Sat Jul 27, 2019 2:11 pm

Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 1:52 pm
Of course, you need to be in a spot where you can actually make out the constellations. The amount of bloody light pollution these days makes it difficult. Being on the edge of the Peak District helps, but I've got no idea how Farnworth/Greater Bolton fares.
Very difficult from my garden location now, due to building and neighbours trees etc which sort of tunnel your vision somewhat.. If the views you mention are based on facing north, then at least I have a start point as Bolton is actually north of Farnworth (roughly). My back kitchen door actually faces West.I have a computer watch which at times seems to play silly xxggers with readings. From across the road to me I can actually see the T.V mast on Winter hill on most days when it isn't xxxxing down so that's a firm pointer once I know its direction. .
The wisest and the best of men, nay, the wisest and best of their actions, may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke...Darcy. Pride and Prejudice.

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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Sat Jul 27, 2019 2:17 pm

TANGODANCER wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 2:11 pm
Lost Leopard Spot wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 1:52 pm
Of course, you need to be in a spot where you can actually make out the constellations. The amount of bloody light pollution these days makes it difficult. Being on the edge of the Peak District helps, but I've got no idea how Farnworth/Greater Bolton fares.
Very difficult from my garden location now, due to building and neighbours trees etc which sort of tunnel your vision somewhat.. If the views you mention are based on facing north, then at least I have a start point as Bolton is actually north of Farnworth (roughly). My back kitchen door actually faces West.I have a computer watch which at times seems to play silly xxggers with readings. From across the road to me I can actually see the T.V mast on Winter hill on most days when it isn't xxxxing down so that's a firm pointer once I know its direction. .
Don't forget, the fixed background rotates once every twenty four hours, and the planets move against that background. Plus the fixed background nods up and down like a sine wave, four times a year...
You'll suss it.
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Re: Science, Experiment, and the failure of Reality.

Post by Lost Leopard Spot » Sat Jul 27, 2019 2:25 pm

If it's not pissing it down tonight, and the skies are cloud free, stand in your kitchen door at 10 o'clock tonight, and turn 35 degrees to your left. If a tree isn't blocking your view, down close to the horizon will be the brightest dot in the dusk sky.
That's Jupiter.
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